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Dr. Su-Hsing Lin’s Portland Cultural Trip

Figure 1: " Dr. Lin and students of Warsaw University "

Short haired and bright eyed, Dr. Su-hsing Lin is an assistant professor in the Department of Visual Communication Design in Shu-Te University. People are usually attracted to her by her enthusiasm to art history and delightful laughter, and they enjoy the time taking and listening to her.

Recommended by Professor Inghuey Wong, Dean of Graduate School of Applied Arts Design, Dr. Lin served the interpreter for Dr. Malinoswki when he gave a lecture in Shu-Te University in 2005. Because of this experience, Dr. Lin was invited to attend On the Research of Chinese Art in Poland in Warsaw, Poland. In addition to attending the conference, Dr. Lin delivered a speech, entitled The Development of Chinese Art in Early Twentieth Century, in the Center of Japanese and Far Eastern Art in Cracow and University of Warsaw. She received many positive feedbacks and had good interactions with the audience. Dr. Lin points out a difference existing between Taiwan’s students and students of Warsaw University in terms of their questions about art. The later are interested in Socialism and Soviet art, but they are not very familiar with arts created in capitalist societies. However, Taiwanese students may receive plentiful information from a variety of sources, so they seem to be somewhat aloof and has fewer interactions with speakers.

Dr. Lin majored in history in college. Because she was enchanted by the meaning attached to historical sites, she had been participated in historical investigation, as well as organized a research team to explore different areas and conduct fieldwork. Under the guidance and encouragement of her faculty advisors, she focused her study on art history and eventually obtained a doctoral degree in art history from the Ohio State University.

Figure 2: " Dr. Lin at the veranda outside her office "

A trip to Warsaw provides Dr. Lin an opportunity to better understand the values—industrious and being physically active—that the people hold in Socialistic Poland. She also points out many things that we can learn from Polish people, such as the attitude and policies on repair, protection, and overall planning regarding historic reservation. Dr. Lin joined many participants from Czech, German, China and Taiwan in the international conference. Many of them expressed that the charm and beauty of the eastern art are irresistible. Therefore, her discuss focused on the influence of western art on the eastern art. Her analysis of the similarities between socialistic art and abstractionism had captured the heart of many Eastern European scholars and students.